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Wind & Water School of Feng Shui Blog

Living Room Feng Shui – Bring New Life to Your Living Room

Living RoomBy Jessica Hoelzel

What room in our homes do we not “live in”? All rooms are for living, right?

Ironically, living rooms can be one of the rooms with the least life. The living room, and formal living rooms in particular, have gone out of favor. With an inclination for casual lifestyle and entertainment, families have gravitated towards family rooms and rec rooms – places to watch TV, movies, or play games.

Living rooms have come to feel “stuffy” and go unused. With more space of high value to homeowners, leaving an entire room neglected does not seem wise. From a feng shui perspective, having a room in your home with no life is not wise either. Depending on where that room falls in your home’s bagua, the lack of life (or chi) could be having adverse effects on your life. And especially if it’s the first thing seen upon walking in the door.

If you’re not using your living room, the question is, why? Could it be a place you’d enjoy spending time in? If so, it’s well worth the effort to make it a place that calls you in.

Here are some ways to make the living room more inviting and functional:

  • Create a good flow. Place a table behind the sofa if it backs up to the entrance.
  • Make it homey. Add softness with rugs, throws blankets and pillows.
  • Add some personality. Display artwork and things with special meaning.
  • Bring life to it. Have plants, and décor with lively patterns for visual interest.
  • Create a reason to go in. Lay out magazines or stacks of interesting books; add music.
  • Make it suitable for entertaining. Add a coffee table with a purposeful tray, or a handy bar cart.
  • Set the stage for conversation. Group furniture at 90 degree angles, or around the fireplace.

If, after careful consideration, you’ve determined that a living room is just not a space that makes sense for your family’s lifestyle, is there something else you’re in dire need of? Maybe it would make sense to transform it into something new. With intention, it could go from unused (dead) space to a place of energy and life. Maybe a home office, playroom, music room, or library? You decide.

Chinese New Year of the Monkey

Chinese New YearBy Carole Hyder

The Chinese New Year begins on the second new moon after winter solstice—-this year that date is February 8. If you celebrated the western New Year, this could be a time for you to recommit to or revise your resolutions for 2016.

The Chinese put as much effort into the preparation of the New Year as they do to the actual celebration. You might find some of these helpful in your own New Year rituals.

  1. On days preceding the New Year, Chinese families give their homes a thorough cleaning. It is believed cleaning sweeps away any remaining bad luck from the year before and makes their home ready for good luck. The brooms and dust bins are put out of sight on New Year’s Day so that the newly arrived luck isn’t accidentally swept away.
  2. Painters do a booming business right before New Year, painting doors and window-frames with a new coat of red paint. Homes are often decorated with a set of couplets written on long strips of red paper (one on each side of the door) upon which have been calligraphy-ed a poem or a good luck saying.
  3. Purchasing new clothing and shoes is encouraged to symbolize new beginnings.
  4. Any haircuts are done before the New Year. The Chinese word for hair (fa) is also the word for prosperity so no one wants to cut short their prosperity.
  5. Businesses try to pay off all outstanding debts, and they send gifts to close business associates and family members.

On New Year’s Day there is often a lion dance to symbolize protection. In addition, people give out red envelopes to spread further good wishes for the New Year, which contains a coin for wealth, a piece of candy for life’s sweetness, and a wish for continued good luck and success.

However you may decide to bring in the New Year of the Monkey, make it a special and intentional celebration.

Happy New Year Chinese Characters
Xin Nian Kuai Le – Happy New Year

Transformation with Himalayan Singing Bowls

With Carol Cannon

Carol Cannon

FREE Teleseminar

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

7 p.m. Central

 

Experience the life altering vibrations of the Himalayan Singing Bowls! We’ll talk with certified practitioner Carol Cannon about their history, a variety of uses for the bowls and how to choose a bowl for yourself. She will also lead all attendees in a meditation during the call so that you can experience first-hand the sound therapy benefits of these bowls. Get ready to dial in, close your eyes and let your mind go on a new journey.

Registration closed. Teleseminar was recorded.

*Qualifies as 1 credit towards re-certification for graduates.

Ready, Set, GOAL! Feng Shui for Your New Year’s Goals

Happy New Year 2016

By Lisa Janusz

As we embark upon the start of 2016, many of us are in forward-looking state of mind. This is the time to set goals for the year ahead – and I encourage you to do so.

 

 

As you set your 2016 goals:

  • Make them SMART – Specific (and simple), Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-limited.
    Write them down or share them with someone.
  • Watch self-talk: “Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t–you’re right.” –Henry Ford
  • Remember that there isn’t “failure” – just more information. “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” –Thomas Edison
  • Push yourself. “If you hit the target every time, the target is too near or too big.” –Tom Hirshfield

Be open to adjusting your goals as the year goes on. It’s not to let yourself “off the hook,” but rather allow yourself to change course when it’s appropriate.

From a Feng Shui perspective you can support those goals by paying attention and seeing what’s happening in these areas:

  • The related area of the bagua (if you know it). For example the career area of your home if you are looking for a new opportunity.
  • The room or place that “holds” the energy around your goal. For example, the front door (where opportunities knock) for a new job or the kitchen for health.
  • Your bedroom since this is place to focus on rest and rejuvenation to keep your chi up.
  • Your sacred space. This could be a meditation area, your favorite place to sit or even a vision board (any size – even an index card!).

All of these will help you support your journey for the next year.

Not sure ”goals” is the right focus this year? Maybe a different type of thinking will resonate more with you. See our past blog posts about being resolute and setting an intention for the year.

Whatever you decide to do: know that we are a community that supports you. As we all keep growing and moving forward, we bring out the best in ourselves, and that of others.

What Energy Does the Year of the Monkey Hold for You?

Monkey

FREE Webinar

January 14, 2016 8:00 AM CST – March 1, 2016 8:00 AM CST

 

Carole HyderIn February, the Year of the Monkey replaced the Year of the Sheep. For many, this will be a relief; for others it’ll offer some interesting challenges.

In this FREE webinar, Carole lets you know what to expect – what animals are going to benefit from the Year of the Monkey and who are going to face some challenges.

Find out what might be lying ahead for you and what precautions you can take to make this a spectacular year.

Registration closed. Webinar was recorded.

*Qualifies as 1 credit towards re-certification for graduates.

Wintertime Feng Shui

wintertimeBy Carole Hyder

Every year we face the inevitable change of seasons. We are moving into the most yin time of year—-dark, cold, black, dormancy, introspection. Better known as winter. As part of the yin-yang cycle, we are experiencing a time when things feel, well, dead. And, as part of the natural flow of this yin energy, we also tend to stay inside, even hibernate.

The thing to realize is that despite the overt expression of completion (leaves coming off trees, flowers shriveling, longer days and darker nights), winter brings with it a latent movement, an underlying development that is preparing itself for an eruption in spring. So although all may seem quiet and deserted now, there is plenty of action brewing for later.

It’s no wonder we celebrate holidays during this time—-it’s a direct contrast to the stark silence in the universe. It breaks up the sometimes overwhelming stillness that comes in the winter. To that end, it is important to be aware that winter does require specific Feng Shui considerations around the house. Read our blog post about appropriate winterizing tips.

Keep in mind that this yin time serves a very important purpose: as the seeds in the ground are arranging themselves to break through with all their glory in the spring, we, too, can take advantage of this inner time to plant our own seeds and appear in our own blaze of glory.

Best Moving-Out Practices: Saying Goodbye with Feng Shui

Couple Moving Boxes Between HomesBy Lisa Janusz

There’s a lot that happens prior to leaving a home: preparing, negotiating and finally agreeing. When that “sold” sign goes up, it brings with it all sorts of emotions. It also means more work: sorting, packing, cleaning.

Last month we talked about moving into a new home. This month we’re talking about moving out, and how to approach leaving your home.

Start early. Remember, we’re all about energy around here! Set a reasonable time table for packing and follow it. Moving is hard enough without adding to the chaotic energy that comes with it. By taking your time and being thoughtful, you can ease the energy into shifting.

Don’t take it all with you. As you are packing, be realistic. Take only what you love and will need. Leave behind things that won’t support your next step in your journey. This is the time to break free from guilt of keeping gifts and décor that no longer suit you.

Feng Shui can travel. Take any Feng Shui adjustments you’ve implemented (if they are portable). You can use them in your new space if they are serving the same intention. For example a crystal marking the center can do so at the new place. Otherwise retire them by gifting them, clearing them or letting them return to “normal.” A mirror can become just a mirror.

Cleanse the space. No matter the circumstances, give the home a good cleaning. Not only is this good karma, but also it’s respectful of the home. I have been on both sides – moving into someplace immaculate and entering a new home that needed a major wash down. Hopefully the transition is positive, but if not, remember it’s not the home’s fault.

Get Closure. As Carole mentioned last month, thank the home prior to leaving it. This could be through a letter or just speaking to the house for the last time. Even if you are moving because it drove you crazy, it still provided you some support while you were there. Thank it as best you can before you move on.

The act of moving isn’t much fun. But the energy around it can be quite exciting. It can mark a new stage in life (upsizing or downsizing), a new adventure (relocating) or just a better fit. Either way, feel good about moving on by saying a proper goodbye.

Best Moving-In Practices: Feng Shui Tips for Your New Home

family in yardBy Carole Hyder

Most people would agree that moving is chaotic. No matter how organized or how long the move has been planned, there typically comes a time when frenzy and confusion rule the day. This is not how you want to introduce yourself to your new place. Feng Shui can help make your move more meaningful.

Before leaving your old residence, make sure you did some kind of closure. In other words, say “good-bye.” Whether you liked the old place or not, it deserves a farewell whatever form that might take. I’ve assisted some people who loved their home, providing a beautiful closing ceremony the morning they were leaving. I also know some who couldn’t stand their space and choked out a “thanks” while closing the door. It’s important to close one door before opening another—–in this case that would be a literal action.

Once at the new place, here are some specific things to do the first day you’re there, and other actions that are more long-lasting…

  1. Get your personal bedrooms set up first. Since the bedrooms provide you a safe place to sleep and rejuvenate, they need to be your first and foremost focus. If you’re planning to repaint the walls, re-carpet or remodel in anyway, try to get this done before you actually move in.
  2. Eat in your home the first night. Bringing in food is just fine, since cooking would probably be difficult. But it’s important that you make this commitment to the space by having a meal there. Granted, you may be eating on the floor or sitting on boxes, but that’s no problem—-the house is grateful for your inclusive gesture.
  3. Ring the doorbell for the first few days, every time you walk into your new home. It establishes your presence and your ownership. Since the doorbell is typically by the front door, you’ll be activating that important entry on a regular basis. Plus, you’ll soon learn whether the doorbell works or not.

Making your move intentional and meaningful using a Feng Shui approach will establish a strong relationship with your new home—whether it’s a house, an apartment, a condo or a single room. Then, this new home can help you come home to yourself.

Medical Feng Shui: Setting Up a Clinic for Balance

Clinic Lobby

FREE Webinar

Thursday, November 12, 2015

7 p.m. Central

 

Carole HyderWe talked to the owner/director of a medical clinic in St. Paul. This is as close to shadowing a live appointment that you’ll get (unless you’ve been through our certification program).

Attendees heard how Carole Hyder worked with her client to ensure good flow and harmony to create an environment for business success. They also heard how her client, Dr. PaFoua Yang interpreted and implemented suggestions.

This was a not-to-be-missed opportunity! Utilizing webinar technology, attendees were able to hear about and see through photos the Feng Shui adjustments that were implemented.

Registration closed. Webinar was recorded.

*Qualifies as 1 credit towards re-certification for graduates.

Feng Shui is for the Dogs…and Cats and Other Animals!

Ella -Then

Then

Ella

and Now

By Lisa Janusz

It surprised me to realize just recently that my little princess is turning 10 next month! I am so grateful for all that she has brought into my life. Of course I feel that she is quite a special dog.
(FYI – Carole agrees!)

All animals are very good Feng Shui (you knew that was where this was going, didn’t you?). Anything from the smallest fish to the biggest horse can help activate energy. They represent the Fire Element by bringing a life force to your space. This activity can really support a house, in addition to the people living there.

framed postcardI know for me Feng Shui had a huge impact on Ella’s arrival. I had placed an oversize postcard in my Children & Creativity area shortly after I purchased my home (based on the bagua – the middle right of your space). I hadn’t thought much about it at the time…

Through unusual circumstances, I ended up adopting a puppy from another state (that essentially someone else had picked out for me). Later one of my friends would ask me if it was Ella in the picture – and that’s when the dots connected.

postcard dogAlthough not exact, I could definitely see a resemblance.

Seems my intention of getting a dog after moving into the house gathered some momentum early on.

So this month, instead of several Feng Shui “tips” for you, I have just one: remember that the smallest (and inexpensive) change in your space can support an underlying intention.

Ella 2If you have something you are hoping for – really take a look at your space. If you know the bagua, pay attention to the area that it represents. Then think about how you might add something – like a photo or an object – to help you represent that dream. This goes for houses and offices.

Then be open to what arrives. In my case, a postcard purchased in Europe years prior ended up bringing me a spark of furry love that I’ve enjoyed for almost a decade.

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