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Posts Tagged Energy

About That Clutter You Don’t See – How to Deal with Virtual Clutter

computer and tabletBy Lisa Janusz

It’s a technological world we live in. You can access information within seconds by using a few keystrokes. Although the world is far more “paperless” than it was several years ago, it didn’t stop the clutter. Instead of having piles of papers on your desk, they’re now electronic files on your desktop. Or buried away as emails in your inbox.

Even though you can’t physically see it, it’s still affecting your energy. Take for instance an unsorted inbox. When you open it in the morning and see there are 603 messages (even if only 45 of them are new), it’s immediately overwhelming. These are reminders of things to do, follow up on, sort and file.

From a Feng Shui perspective, that energy could be dragging you down. It could be contributing to feelings of being stressed, burnt out and overwhelmed. In much the same way that you deal with physical clutter, you have to deal with the unseen, technological clutter as well.

Here are a few ideas on how you can start the process.

  1. Utilize the number 9. (It’s an auspicious number.) Deal with 9 things a day for 9 days. File or delete 9 emails, sort and file 9 photos or re-evaluate 9 files.
  2. Get your inbox under control. Set an end-of-day limit for the number of emails. I’m committed to 99. If there are more, start scrolling to see what can be filed, responded to and deleted before you log out.
  3. There’s no time like the present. If you can respond to something immediately, do so. Especially if it takes less than 2 minutes.
  4. Look at what you’ve invited. If you have a bunch of subscriptions, it’s time to evaluate! If you’ve fallen behind, don’t review each one, sort by sender and delete all but the most recent email.
  5. Organize your photos. Put a reminder in your calendar to download your photos each month. Set aside some time after to create folders and sort them.
  6. Customize a process for you. Figure out your own personal system to deal with technological clutter and stick to it.

No matter where we turn, there’s the potential for clutter! If you are feeling the effects, prioritize dealing with it. You never know what awaits you once you have the room to receive it, email or otherwise.

Create a Feng Shui Office at Home

feng-shui-home-officeBy Carole Hyder

Because more and more people are working out of their homes, creating a home office that is efficient and productive is important.

Regardless of whether a client comes to the home or if the business is totally reliant on sales/emails/fax, requiring no physical interaction with clients, there are some important Feng Shui considerations to assure success and focus.

The biggest issue with a home office is that it is easy to relax its professional potential. This may be even more so when the office is housed in what used to be a bedroom or if it must share the space with sporadic guest accommodations. Sleeping and working are exclusive of one another.

The office color should be reflective of a business, not a color left-over from when it was a bedroom. You don’t want to look up and remember when your little boy played with his trucks in that room. Those memories, although precious and unforgettable, may not be inspiring to you in terms of getting work done.

Here are 3 additional tips to help you create a Feng Shui office at home…

  1. Use a high-backed chair. Making decisions, calling on clients, paying bills are all activities that can require you to feel like you need all the assistance you can get. A tall chair supports you.
  2. Sit so you can see the entry. To feel strong and empowered, sit in the office so that you can easily see anyone coming into the space. If you have your back to the door, you may be caught off-guard or be side-swiped by some unexpected event.
  3. Keep your work in your office. To set healthy boundaries, don’t make a habit of bringing your work into other parts of the house. Keep the door to your office closed when you’re not working and set business hours. Although you may love what you do, a balanced life is a more wholesome one.

Following these few ideas will help you on your path to being productive. If the office looks and feels professional, prosperous and productive, the business will align with that as well.

Feng Shui is for the Dogs…and Cats and Other Animals!

Ella -Then

Then

Ella

and Now

By Lisa Janusz

It surprised me to realize just recently that my little princess is turning 10 next month! I am so grateful for all that she has brought into my life. Of course I feel that she is quite a special dog.
(FYI – Carole agrees!)

All animals are very good Feng Shui (you knew that was where this was going, didn’t you?). Anything from the smallest fish to the biggest horse can help activate energy. They represent the Fire Element by bringing a life force to your space. This activity can really support a house, in addition to the people living there.

framed postcardI know for me Feng Shui had a huge impact on Ella’s arrival. I had placed an oversize postcard in my Children & Creativity area shortly after I purchased my home (based on the bagua – the middle right of your space). I hadn’t thought much about it at the time…

Through unusual circumstances, I ended up adopting a puppy from another state (that essentially someone else had picked out for me). Later one of my friends would ask me if it was Ella in the picture – and that’s when the dots connected.

postcard dogAlthough not exact, I could definitely see a resemblance.

Seems my intention of getting a dog after moving into the house gathered some momentum early on.

So this month, instead of several Feng Shui “tips” for you, I have just one: remember that the smallest (and inexpensive) change in your space can support an underlying intention.

Ella 2If you have something you are hoping for – really take a look at your space. If you know the bagua, pay attention to the area that it represents. Then think about how you might add something – like a photo or an object – to help you represent that dream. This goes for houses and offices.

Then be open to what arrives. In my case, a postcard purchased in Europe years prior ended up bringing me a spark of furry love that I’ve enjoyed for almost a decade.

Flushing out the Bathroom: Is Your Feng Shui Going Down the Drain?

Through the Doorway of a BathroomBy Carole Hyder

Because Feng Shui is a language of metaphor, if someone feels “drained” or describes opportunities as “flushing away,” those words can point to the negative impact of the bathroom. It’s hard to imagine living without an indoor bathroom, yet their convenience is often over-ridden by their Feng Shui challenges. We don’t want to see them when we first enter a space, while we’re eating, or when we’re sleeping in order to avoid our energy being drained.

However, the bathroom has moved from being strictly functional to a room that feels like a spa. Adding the ability to wash up and brush our teeth, bathe and/or shower, and put on make-up in the same space as the toilet has added a whole new consideration to the room we originally considered a necessary evil. People have come to love their bathrooms and often see them as sanctuaries.

Here are some Feng Shui considerations to make your bathroom even more spectacular:

  1. Because the bathroom now encourages a person to linger, don’t be afraid to hang artwork on the walls. This may be artwork that you don’t want others to see due to its intimate nature or it may simply be something you love.
  2. Have the option to change the lighting in order to emphasize its versatility—–bright for getting ready in the morning and dim for relaxing in the tub.
  3. Error on the side of lush when considering the design of your bathroom. This might include thick plush towels, soft rugs and fresh flowers.
  4. Be certain that the wall colors are complimentary to your skin tones. If you don’t look good in blue, you wouldn’t want to fix your hair in a room with blue walls.
  5. To balance all the water that is naturally present in the bathroom, add a plant or flowers (Wood element) and candles or the color red (Fire element).

As Feng Shui consultants, we still analyze the placement of the bathroom in relation to the rest of the house. However, a beautifully appointed bathroom is not as apt to drain your energy as one that is purely functional.

A Complement of Energies

I am sitting heAroma Therapy Bowl of Flowersre at my desk looking out the window at the snow that still covers our lawn. Weather can affect so much about our day. It can be both beautiful and challenging at the same time. A pretty snowfall can be so peaceful, while still creating hazardous driving conditions. Like most things in life there is a yin and yang. They need each other to create balance.

Besides Taoism, yin and yang is one of the earliest concepts associated with Feng Shui and many other modalities (I-Ching, Chinese Medicine, yoga, martial arts). No doubt you are familiar with the tai chi symbol. The circle comprised of black and white tear-drop shapes intricately connected, yet, visibly different. They flow into one another making it difficult to tell where one begins or the other ends. Each has a center of the opposite. Even in the darkest space there is some light; and in the lightest space some dark.

Yin is considered the feminine energy often described as inward and receptive. Yang is considered the masculine energy often described as outward, dynamic and expressive. Most things have a yin and a yang. Hot and cold, night and day, rough and smooth are all examples. At first they might appear to be opposites, but upon further reflection we see that they are complementary.

Each provides its own advantages and at times may enable you to look more positively at the other. Too much heat might make you long for some refreshing cooler air. The energy of the day can keep you motivated, but the stillness of night is what helps you rejuvenate. Together they create harmony.

In Feng Shui we use the yin and yang concept to look at spaces from a balanced perspective. A space that is overly one or the other often lacks a sense of stability and comfort.

Look around your space to see if you have a balance of yin (curvy, round, asymmetrical, soft, sentimental, reflective) and yang (straight, square/columnar, symmetrical, productive). Look at paint colors; are they dark and saturated or light and bright? Look at your furniture; is it soft and comfy or do you have more hard lines? Those are two areas that you can start to think about how to balance with the complementary. Places to start include adding soft colors to a dark room, or adding round pillows/tables to a room that has more square furniture, for example.

I know that soon the white carpet that has captured a tiny boot print from my son and a larger paw print from my dog will melt and fade away. The yin of the winter will start to transition into the yang energy that captures spring and summer. And when the timing is right we will complement the memory of snow by capturing our footprints in the grass.

lisamccueBy Lisa Janusz

Wind & Water School of Feng Shui Registrar and Faculty

Address

901 W. Minnehaha Pkwy, Minneapolis MN 55419
Phone: (612) 823-5093
Website: https://windwaterschool.com
E-mail: info@windwaterschool.com