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Posts Tagged Food

Food and Feng Shui – Part 2

fruits and veggiesBy Carole Hyder

In our last post, Lisa’s article focused on the physical space of where you eat. In this next part of the series, I focus on what to eat and when.

The approach is based on the 5 Chinese Elements:

Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water

This method for nourishment follows the rhythmic pattern of nature, one that can influence our own state of health.

Ways to incorporate the 5 Element concept in our eating choices:

1. WOOD

Foods appropriate for Wood are asparagus and celery because they’re green and grow upward. Lemons and limes are also appropriate because they are sour, the taste for Wood. Grapefruit, sauerkraut, pickles and vinegar also fall into the Wood category.

Eat Wood foods when you are beginning a project, trying to hold a vision or wanting to move forward.

2. FIRE

The Fire element manifests as a bitter flavor, vegetables that branch outward, fruits that grow around a central pit, and the color red. Romaine lettuce, watercress and dandelion greens are Fire foods. Fire also has a thermal nature so hot and spicy foods are also appropriate—-ginger, cinnamon, cloves, hot peppers, cayenne.

Fire foods are appropriate when you are looking for more passion, more power, and more ways to express yourself.

3. EARTH

Sweetness in life is expressed by the Earth element. Foods that have Earth qualities are sweet fruits, figs, dates, honey, squash. Oranges and carrots are also considered Earth foods because yellow/orange are the colors for Earth.

Eat Earth foods when you need comforting and stability.

4. METAL

Metal foods are pungent—–mustard greens, basil, radishes, cabbage, cucumbers. Metal foods can also be white, such as garlic, cauliflower, and parsnips.

Concentrate on Metal foods when your efforts are focused on eliminating or separating from things in your life, bringing closure, or grieving.

5. WATER

Salty is the taste associated with the Water element. This includes salt, seaweed, kelp, and fish. The color for Water is black so black beans, blackberries, dark grapes, eggplant are associated with Water.

Eat Water foods when you want to re-charge, slow down, and be reflective.

As you can see, this is a complex topic. A comprehensive book about the 5 Chinese Elements is Warren King’s “Love Your Organs, Love Yourself” – www.loveyourorgans.com. Take a look for more ideas and inspiration on what foods might be right for you, and when.

How Holistic Health Leads to Wellness & Weight Loss

With Shannon Leavitt

yoga mat and candles

FREE Teleseminar

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

7 p.m. Central

shannon-300x281A healthy lifestyle is beyond just food and exercise.

Holistic health takes into account your body, mind and spirit. How they align, or don’t, can have significant impact on your health and your personal chi.

That’s right; there are many parallels with how you relate to your physical body and how you relate to your physical space. In this call, you will learn how to discover those commonalities and put them into practice for a healthier you. You’ll also be given some new tools to help you move towards multi-dimensional, holistic health.

Register Here

The teleseminar will be recorded, but registration is required.

*Qualifies as 1 credit towards re-certification for graduates.

Food and Feng Shui – Part 1

dining tableBy Lisa Janusz

There are many dimensions to Feng Shui. Its breadth spans from your living space, to your personal chi, to even the food you eat. When we think about food in Feng Shui, we think about health. Food provides sustenance at its core and well-being through the act of eating – enjoying and connecting with others.

What you eat is important, but it’s also where and how you eat that can have an effect, too.

Here are some tips to help you think about where your body absorbs the nutrients it needs:

Eat at a proper place. This means having somewhere that you actually sit down to eat (Not a desk! Not a coffee table in front of the TV!) People are often surprised that we use our dining room table three times a day – yep, all the “main” meals (we don’t have an eat-in kitchen). Whether it’s a kitchen or dining, a table is best because you can really connect. I know there are islands are out there with room for the whole family, but it’s different sitting in a line versus around something.

Be mindful about preparing the food. Yes, I know you’re busy. But this is important; pay attention while getting a meal together (from scratch, a package or take out). There’s a traditional aspect around that: the energy you have when you are preparing a meal gets “cooked” into the food and fed to your family. So you want to be relaxed, happy and grateful.

Be mindful about eating. Set the table and turn off electronics. No phones or tablets, no TV in the background. Don’t rush. Sit down, look at your food — really see it. Then taste it and enjoy it. Make the meal an experience. If you’re having health issues, visualize that food giving you nutrients you need.

Energize any stale eating areas. If you do have a dining room that you don’t use, or only use once or twice a year for holidays, energize that room by eating there more frequently. Maybe try Sunday dinner in there. It will be a whole new experience for you.

Now that I’ve gotten you thinking about where and how you eat, next time we’ll be talking about how food can take on different properties depending on what it is. In part two, Carole is going to explore how food relates to the elements (color, season, etc.).

In the meantime, sit down and enjoy. And share a picture of your kitchen or dining room table on our Facebook page. I’ll be posting mine later this week. And I’ll see if I can’t get Carole and Jessica to post theirs, too.

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